Style of Fences

In most countries, neighbors have legal rights in relation to fencing. Within an area built as an integrated development, the owner of a building used for domestic or business purposes is obliged at the request of the owner of the neighboring plot to enclose his plot along the common boundary. Local (or national) regulations may, if both plots are built on or used commercially, require both owners to erect a boundary fence/wall jointly and share the cost. Under English law, ownership of, and responsibility for, fences etc. is spelt out in the property owner’s deeds.

A fence is a structure that encloses an area, typically outdoors, and is usually constructed from posts that are connected by boards, wire, rails or netting. A fence differs from a wall in not having a solid foundation along its whole length.

The style of fence chosen should always suit the locality as far as possible.
Fencing that is intended to protect against wild animals should be sunk 10 – 20 cm into the ground, particularly between hedges (see the picture below).

Hedge with wire netting

Hedge with wire netting

Here are some examples of styles of fences that can be applied to your property.

Some examples of fencing styles

Some examples of fencing styles

Wooden fencing, posts, frames and palisades can last more than 30 years if they are first chemically impregnated in a tank.
Wooden louvre fences are best for privacy →⑦ + ⑧ and can also provide some measure of sound insulation. Scissor or rustic fencing is also popular for plot enclosure →⑨.

This “Style of Fences”, referencing the book Architects’ Data written by Ernst and Peter Neufert, whereas this book has become the guideline for architecture college students in the world.

 

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