Pros and Cons of Gardening Wall-Climbing Plants for Houses.

Perhaps you already understand All You Need to Know About Garden, and if so you’ll know that sometimes an ordinary potted plant is not enough to pretty up the house. Most of the time, your house may not have enough space for a suitable garden in front of the door, porch, or garage walkway. To spruce up those plain walls of your houses, wall-climbing plants or creepers are a good choice to make! Why should you start gardening wall-climbing plants for your house, though?

It is true that wall-climbing plants can harbor insect pests, birds (and subsequently, bird droppings) and other animals and provide them easy access to the interior of your house. But only some of them are bad for your house. Some wall-climbing plants can cause structural problems if left unchecked; some can genuinely provide benefits which are good for houses!

Wall-Climbing Plants You Should Avoid

Wall-climbing plants that have “suckers” or little mini branches like spikes that burrow under the paint or pebble-dash, into the render of the wall for a foothold. For years, the penetrations made by these “self clingers” into the wall won’t cause any inconveniences. But if left unchecked, once they accumulated to millions the wall-climbing plant will enter the wall surface by one big incursion and suck natural moisture in walls, undermining adhesion of the parts of the wall that make up bricks and blocks – basically weakening the houses’ walls. If they grow too tall, they might enter the roofs’ space and dislodge roof tiles, crack timbers and make holes on your roof (Check out All You Need to Know About a Roof). If the wall-climbing plant has a very thick “trunk” or base and it’s very close to the wall, the roots can dig deep down and undermine the foundations of your house – in other words, cause you expensive repairs.

If you want to successfully garden wall-climbing plants to be good for houses, you need to avoid choosing these wall-climbing plants:

  • Trumpet Vine (Campsis)
  • A type of Climbing Hydrangea (Pileostegia viburnoides)
  • Star Jasmine (Trachelospernum jasminoides)

 

Wall-Climbing Plants that are Good for Houses

Don’t be hasty to shut this option after just hearing the disadvantages of what some wall-climbing plants can cause. They will only happen if you don’t take care of them properly and neglect their care. Now we’re going to go over the benefits when you garden wall-climbing plants for houses.

Wall-climbing plants are easy to grow. Wall-climbing plants are capable of thriving in dark, shady places where other plants find it difficult to grow, so they’ll cover whatever empty spaces that has been nagging at you over how bare they are.

Not only do they look beautiful, they can be beneficial to both the wall it’s growing on and to backyard wildlife. Wall-climbing plants cover up unsightly walls and provide a thin layer of insulation on walls, which means they help retain heat in the winter (So useful!) and they keep walls cooler in the summer, which reduces home heating and cooling costs (So awesome)!

Many wall-climbing plants attract swarms of bees in the late summer, but they don’t bother you as they only concentrate on harvesting the pollen. If you want to attract birds to your garden, wall-climbing plants provide the avians good places to perch and roost.

Boston Ivy in particular has waxy leaves that shed rainwater, so they reduce the amount of moisture coming into contact with walls and help prolong the life of sound masonry.

  • Fire-thorn
  • Virginia Creeper (Parthenocissus quinquefolia) (although this one’s a challenge, as it is invasive)
  • Climbing Rose Plants such as Wisteria (it likes sunny positions or partial shade, plenty of space and needs 2 prunes a year – in January/February and July/August. Some climbing roses can cope with north-facing walls.)
  • Clematis rehderiana (It’s gorgeous and excellent for bees)
  • Hops (a food plant for the comma butterfly’s caterpillars)
  • Honeysuckle (Its beautiful flowers offer nectar to long-tongued moths, plus delicious berries for the birds)
  • Common Jasmine
  • Passion Flower
  • Boston Ivy (a Japanese creeper which fast-growing suckers – while they won’t penetrate walls – must be kept away from getting too tall as they can dislodge roof tiles and gutter – easily done with annual pruning. It’s vigorous, but its clinging pads are less damaging than regular ivy’s aerial roots. This wall-climbing plant is suited to north and east-facing walls. The rich green leaves will turn a lovely red come Autumn/Fall)
  • Other types of Climbing Hydrangea
  • Sunflowers (Seriously! Ideal for a bungalow or single story home)

If you decided to opt out on gardening wall-climbing plants, perhaps you’re interested in another type of wall decoration. Check out Making a Cheap House Wall with Interlocking Bricks! While you are at it, might as well learn more about Making Energy-saving Walls for House.

If you wish to start gardening wall-climbing plants for your house, go to How to Successfully Garden Wall-Climbing Plants to be Good for Houses!

2 Comments

  • How to Successfully Garden Wall-Climbing Plants to be Good for Houses – i-deaHOUSE February 17, 2018 at 3:45 pm

    […] Sometimes an ordinary potted plant is not enough to pretty up the house. Most of the time, your house may not have enough space for a suitable garden in front of the door, porch, or garage walkway. To spruce up those plain walls of your houses, wall-climbing plants or creepers are a good choice to make! If you want to know the advantages and the disadvantages of wall-climbing plants, check out Pros and Cons of Gardening Wall-Climbing Plants for Houses. […]

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  • 5 Ways to Breathe Better at Home | i-deaHOUSE June 25, 2018 at 2:49 pm

    […] Houseplants [link: pros and cons of gardening wall-climbing plants] They look nice to look and good for your home’s air. They’re not even hard to maintain (link: […]

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